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U.S. moon landing rocket launch pad struck by lightning, originally scheduled to launch on 8.29

Posting time:2022-12-06 01:33:35

U.S. moon landing rocket launch pad struck by lightning, originally scheduled to launch on 8.29

Recently, according to CNMO, the lightning protection device of the 39B launch pad of the Nedi Space Center, where the new generation of the U.S. moon landing rocket "Space Launch System" is located, suffered three lightning strikes. It is reported that the space launch system was originally scheduled to be launched from 8:33 to 10:33 local time on the 29th, and had entered the 48-hour countdown before the launch when it was struck by lightning. It is understood that the NASA website issued a statement saying that the Kennedy Space Center in Florida continued to experience thunderstorms on the afternoon of the 27th. The lightning protection device of the 39B launch pad where the Space Launch System is located was struck by lightning three times. Preliminary data show that the power of these lightning strikes Not much. Meteorological staff collected data on lightning strike voltage and current, which will be shared with electromagnetic environment experts to assess the impact of lightning strikes on launch missions. It is understood that the lightning protection device includes three lightning protection towers and wires about 182 meters high to protect the rocket and the spacecraft it carries. Related news reports According to CCTV News on August 29, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) officially stated that despite the lightning strike on the launch pad this past weekend, it still plans to launch a new generation of lunar rockets on the 29th "Space Launch" system" to perform the test mission of the "Artemis 1" unmanned flight around the moon. According to previous reports, "Artemis 1" is the first step in the United States' plan to return to the moon. If the mission is successful, NASA expects to launch the "Artemis 2" manned lunar orbital mission as early as 2024, and finally the "Artemis 3" lunar landing mission. Under the entire Artemis program, U.S. astronauts could return to the moon as early as the end of 2025.

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